Open Source Alternatives

I don’t know if it is possible at this point in time to avoid working in Microsoft applications. Given how many organizations now have some version of Office 365, it seems like all outputs are eventually a Word document, a PowerPoint slide deck, or an Excel spreadsheet. But those are outputs, not throughputs, and I don’t think any of those applications is terribly good to think with. Communicate to/with others who are used to things being packaged in a particular way? Okay, fine, here’s a Word document.

The process involved in getting to an outcome should be more flexible, more tuned to how individuals and teams work. For the record, Teams works well enough, but OneNote is a disaster. Personally, I use Devonthink and Scrivener for the iterative process of bigger projects, but neither of them is team-friendly. And neither is really all that iPhone-friendly, really. They have iPhone apps, which are really quite functional, but the true power of both apps is really best experienced on the Mac. (I only use two devices: a Mac and an iPhone, so the iPad version of both may very well be an incredible experience, but I decided a while ago that my version of techno-minimalism meant I only ever worked on, and worried about, a computer and a phone.)

The problem, for me, is that collaboration needs to occur across platforms, so it looks like I am stuck with web apps. That noted, there appear to be a range of open source alternatives that look pretty good. BTW has collected over 200 open source alternatives to a range of software tools that businesses use: from note-code databases to note-taking to kanban.

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