It Gets Crowded in There

Nicole Perlroth has a book out, This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends, and Wired has published an excerpt focused on “The Untold History of America’s Zero-Day Market.” I LOLed at this:

The first thing spies do after breaking into a machine, Sabien told me, is listen in for other spies. If they found evidence that the infected machine was beaconing out to another command-and-control center, they would scrape whatever others were catching. It wasn’t abnormal, Sabien said, to find multiple spies listening in on the same machine—especially in the case of high-profile diplomats, arms dealers, or terror networks.

I think I imagined dozens of tiny spies inside the various pieces of the computer’s mother board, sneaking around, spying on each other, unaware (or indifferent) that they were themselves being spied upon. It’s like something out of a Pink Panther movie, like that scene in The Pink Panther Scene where the assassins, who are all trying to kill our beloved Inspector Clouseau, end up killing each other as he makes his way unwittingly through Oktoberfest: Youtube.

M1 Macbook Air and the CLI

Not all is right yet with the transition to the new ARM-architecture Macs. In particular, my MBA seems not to want to install numpy using pip. To get to that point, however, I did the following:

Set the shell to the preferred architecture:

arch -x86_64 /usr/local/bin/zsh

Set my preferred shell:

/bin/bash

It looks like the architecture is correct.

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 3.2.57(1)-release (arm64-apple-darwin20)

I may try re-install MacPorts and then Python and PIP from scratch, in the hopes that 6 weeks after I first did the above, things have changed and are less wonky.