ACB at LBF

Louisiana Book Festival 2017

I am delighted to announce that The Amazing Crawfish Boat will be one of the featured books at this year’s Louisiana Book Festival. The book talk is scheduled for Saturday afternoon, 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the First Floor Meeting Room of the Capitol Park Museum. If you’re at the Festival, come say hello or swing by the festival’s store after the talk to find me signing books. See you there!

AIs Talk among Themselves

While science fiction has a long history of human-AI/robot interaction, especially in terms of dialogue, the idea of robots/AIs talking to each other gained a lot more currency in the wake of two Facebook AIs seemingly developing their own language. First, a more reasoned summary of what happend at Facebook from the BBC. And now something a bit more sensational. This Quora post also has a bit more on what happened at Facebook.

All of this concern about AIs talking to each other has a history, at least in science fiction. One moment to consider occurred in 1970’s The Forbin Project in which the USA build a supercomputer to oversee its strategic defense systems (missiles, bombers, you name it), only to discover that the USSR (now Russia) had a similar computer. It’s not too long before the two computers demand to talk directly to each other, then merge to form “World Control.”

One good place to start a larger history of robots and AIs talking to each other is Emily Asher-Perrin’s survey on Tor. (Tor is a long-time publisher of science fiction and fantasy literature; their website contains a mix of original fiction, thoughtful essays, and read or watch-alongs of classic or beloved works in the genres.)

(Perhaps one thing to think about is the difference between robots as corporealized entities and artificial intelligences as noncorporeal entities: our responses to intra-entity dialogue seems to differ significantly based on whether the consciousness is individuated in a way that our own seems to be.)